Patient Instructions


Collage of Beautiful Smiles
General Guidelines for all procedures:

Do not chew on hard, sticky or chewy foods for at least 24 hours. Never chew on ice. Avoid aggressive chewing and sticky foods such as “hard tack” candies that can loosen or damage a restoration. Carefully follow all guidelines provided by the doctor and their staff and most importantly practice good oral hygiene. Additional instructions following various types of treatment are listed below. Please click on the topics below for detailed instructions. In the event of an emergency, please call our office. If you are experiencing a serious or life threatening emergency, please call 911 or visit the nearest emergency room.


  • Please wear loose clothing to facilitate rolling up of the sleeve.
  • DO NOT eat anything for at least 8 hours before surgery.
  • Parents or guardians should observe children prior to surgery to make certain there is no consumption of foods or fluids.
  • You may drink clear liquids (water, fruit juices WITHOUT PULP, carbonated beverages, clear tea and black coffee) up to 4 hours before the appointment.
  • If you normally take pills for high blood pressure, thyroid or asthma, please take them with a LITTLE sip of water an hour before the appointment.
  • Please come 30 minutes ahead of your scheduled appointment if this is your first visit to our office.
  • Patients must be accompanied by an adult who will remain in the waiting area during surgery and until the recovery period is over. Any patient under the age of 18 must have a parent or legal guardian present at the time of the procedure. (You will NOT be allowed to take a cab home.)
  • We encourage payments prior to your surgery to expedite your discharge after you awaken following surgery.
  • If you have been given an antibiotic prescription at the time of your consultation, PLEASE TAKE THE ANTIBIOTIC AN HOUR BEFORE YOUR APPOINTMENT WITH A SIP OF WATER.
  • Please remove nail polish and lipstick.
  • Notify our office if you develop a cold, sore throat, cough, fever or any other illness prior to the surgery.

REST ASSURED THAT YOU WILL RECEIVE COMPASSIONATE AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICE.

Sometimes the after-effects of oral surgery are quite minimal, so not all of these instructions may apply. Common sense will often dictate what you should do. However, when in doubt follow these guidelines or call our office for clarification.

DAY OF SURGERY

FIRST HOUR: Bite down firmly on the gauze packs that have been placed over the surgical areas, making sure they remain in place. The packs may be gently removed after you reach home. Look at the gauze before you throw it away; if it is soaked in blood, you do need to replace it with fresh gauze. Prior to replacing the gauze, drink a milkshake/ice cream or yogurt with a spoon and then take your pain medications – one prescription strength Motrin and an extra strength Tylenol. Now take two pieces of gauze from the goody bag, roll it like a cigar and fold it and place it snugly in the area of extraction and bite down for 20 minutes. Redness in the center of the gauze is normal; the gauze needs to be replaced only if it is soaked in blood. Intermittent bleeding or oozing overnight is normal.

FIRST 24 HOURS: Do not disturb the surgical area. Do NOT spit, rinse, brush your teeth at night, consume hot food or use a straw on the day of the surgery. Please do not smoke since this is very detrimental to healing and may cause a dry socket. Use ice on the outside of the face, 20 minutes on and 5 minutes off until bedtime. Do not smoke for the first 24 hours.

PERSISTENT BLEEDING: Bleeding should never be severe. If it is, it usually means that the packs are being clenched between teeth only and are not exerting pressure on the surgical areas. Try repositioning the packs. If bleeding persists or becomes heavy you may substitute a tea bag (soaked in very hot water, squeezed damp-dry and wrapped in moist gauze) for 20 or 30 minutes. If bleeding remains uncontrolled, please call our office to reach Dr. Sreeni. Do not physically exert yourself for 5 days following surgery, as this will cause unexpected bleeding.

PAIN: Unfortunately most oral surgery is accompanied by some degree of discomfort. You will usually have a prescription for pain medication. If you take the pills before the anesthetic has worn off you should be able to manage any discomfort better. Repeat the pain medications (Motrin + Tylenol) every four hours on the first two days of surgery while awake. If you feel that the pain is not adequately controlled with the mild pain medication combination, please take the prescribed strong pain medication. We encourage our patients to be couch potatoes on the day of surgery, as activities will increase wooziness and nausea. BSX of pain medications varies widely among individuals. If you find you are taking large amounts of pain medication at frequent intervals, please call our office.

NAUSEA: Nausea is not uncommon after surgery. Sometimes the intravenous anesthesia or pain medications are the cause. Nausea can be reduced by preceding each pain pill with a small amount of soft food. Try to keep taking clear liquids and minimize dosing of pain medications, but call us if you do not feel better. Classic Coca Cola/Soda may help with nausea.

DIET: Eat any nourishing food that can be taken with comfort. Avoid hot food on day of surgery. Do not use a straw for the first day after surgery. It is advisable to confine the first day’s intake to liquids or puréed foods (soups (room temperature), puddings, yogurt, milk shakes, etc.). It is best to avoid foods like nuts, sunflower seeds, popcorn, etc. for three weeks as they may get lodged in the socket areas. It is important not to skip meals! If you take nourishment regularly you will feel better, gain strength, have less discomfort and heal faster. If you are diabetic, maintain your normal eating habits or follow instructions given by your doctor.

SHARP EDGES: If you feel something hard or sharp edges in the surgical areas, it is likely you are feeling bony walls which once supported the extracted teeth. Occasionally small slivers of bone may work themselves out during the following week or so. If they cause concern or discomfort, please call the office.

MOUTH RINSES: Keeping your mouth clean after surgery is essential. Rinse only after the first 24 hours. Use 1/4 teaspoon of salt dissolved in 8 ounces of warm water and gently rinse with portions of solution, taking five minutes to use the entire glassful. Repeat as often as you like, but certainly after every meal.

BRUSHING: Begin your normal oral hygiene routine 24 hours after surgery. Soreness and swelling may not permit vigorous brushing, but please make every effort to clean your teeth within the bounds of comfort.

HEALING: Normal healing after tooth extraction should be as follows: the first two days after surgery are generally the most uncomfortable, and there is usually some swelling. On the third day you should be more comfortable and, although still swollen, can usually begin a more substantial diet. The remainder of the post-operative course should be gradual, steady improvement.

Following these instructions will assist you, but if you have questions about your progress, please call our office. You can contact one of our doctors after hours although calling during office hours will afford a faster response to your question or concern.

WHAT TO DO AFTER SURGERY:  The incision wounds after surgery usually heal quickly and without complications, if simple precautions are taken. Cooperating with your oral surgeon is important.

Here are some guidelines and instructions for you to follow to aid in your healing and recovery:
Rest at home, minimize talking, and generally take it easy for 24-48 hours following surgery. It may not be necessary to be in bed rest; but it is important that you rest. Sometimes the after-effects of oral surgery are quite minimal, so not all of these instructions may apply. Common sense will often dictate what you should do. However, when in doubt, follow these guidelines or call our office for clarification.

DAY OF SURGERY

FIRST HOUR: Bite down firmly on the gauze packs making sure they remain in place. The packs may be gently removed after you reach home. Look at the gauze before you throw it away. If it is soaked in blood, you do need to replace it with fresh gauze. Prior to replacing the gauze, drink a milkshake, ice cream or yogurt with a spoon (DO NOT USE STRAW FOR AT LEAST SIX DAYS) and then take your pain medication – one prescription strength Motrin and on extra strength Tylenol. Now take two pieces of gauze from the goody bag, roll it like a cigar and fold it and place it snugly in the area of the implant and bite dawn for 20 minutes (MOISTURIZE THE GAUZE WITH A LITLLE BIT OF WATER BEFORE PUTTING IT IN). Redness in the center of the gauze is normal; the gauze needs to be replaced only if it soaked in blood. Intermittent bleeding or oozing overnight is normal.

FIRST 24 HOURS: Do not disturb the surgical area. Do not spit, rinse, brush your teeth at night, consume hot food or use a straw on the day of the surgery. PLEASE DO NOT SMOKE since this is very detrimental to healing.

SWELLING: The surgical area will swell and may become quite large. After the procedure apply an ice pack to the side of the face, 20 minutes on and 5 minutes off until bedtime. Moist heat, like a warm, wet washcloth, will aid in reducing swelling after the first 24 hours. Swelling usually reaches its maximum within the first 40 hours post surgery and then slowly decreases.

PERSISTENT BLEEDING: Bleeding should never be severe. If it is, it usually means that the packs are being clenched between the teeth only and are not exerting pressure on the surgical areas. Try repositioning the packs. If bleeding persists or becomes heavy you may substitute a tea bag (soaked in very hot water, squeezed damp-dry and wrapped in moist gauze) for 30 minutes. If bleeding remains uncontrolled, please call our office to reach the doctor on call. Do no physically exert yourself for 5 days following surgery, as this will cause unexpected bleeding.

PAIN: Unfortunately, most oral surgery is accompanied by some degree of discomfort. You will usually have a prescription for pain medication. If you take the pills before the anesthetic has worn off, you should be able to manage any discomfort better. Repeat the pain medication (Motrin + Tylenol) every four hours on the first two days of surgery while awake. If you feel that the pain is not adequately controlled with the mild pain medication combination, please take the prescribed strong pain medication. We encourage our patients to be couch potatoes on the day of surgery, as activities will increase ooziness and nausea. The effects of pain medication vary widely among individuals. If you find you are taking large amounts of pain medicine at frequent intervals, please call our office.

DIET: Eat any nourishing food that can be taken with comfort. Avoid hot foods on day of surgery. Do not use a straw for the first day after surgery. It is advisable to confine the first day’s intake to liquids or pureed goods (soups (room temperature), puddings, yogurt, milk shakes, etc.). It is best to avoid foods like nuts, sunflower seeds, popcorn etc. for three weeks, as they may get lodged in the socket areas. It is important not to skip meals! If you take nourishment regularly you will feel better, gain strength, have less discomfort and heal faster. If you are diabetic, maintain your normal eating habits or follow instructions given by your doctor. Since you will be taking medication, it is very important that you eat before each medication course to prevent nausea.

FIRST 24 HOURS: Cold, liquid diet only.

SECOND DAY AFTER SURGERY: May start warm, soft food and continue it for 3 weeks.

Here are some foods we recommend:

  • Milk
  • Yogurt
  • Oatmeal or cream of wheat
  • Ice cream
  • Soft boiled or scrambled eggs
  • Milkshakes
  • Soups
  • Applesauce
  • Boiled fish
  • Pudding
  • Potatoes- baked or mashed
  • Jell-O

BRUSHING: Begin your normal oral hygiene routine 24 hours after surgery. Soreness and swelling may not permit vigorous brushing, but please make every effort to clean your teeth within the bounds of comfort.

MOUTH RINSES: Keeping your mouth clean after surgery is essential. Rinse only after the first 24 hours. Use ¼ teaspoon of salt dissolved in an 8 ounce glass of warm water and gently rinse with portions of solution, taking five minutes to use the entire glassful. Repeat as often as you like, but certainly after every meal.

BRUISING: Bruising sometimes occurs after tooth exposure. It is a natural result of the drilling involved in placing the implant – you should not be alarmed if it occurs. The bruising is often visible a few days post surgery and may be located either above or below the area that the implants were places.

HEALING: Normal healing after tooth exposure should be as follows: The first two days after surgery are generally the most uncomfortable, and there is usually some swelling. On the third day you should be more comfortable and, although still swollen, can usually begin a more substantial diet. The remainder of the post-operative course should be gradual, steady improvement.

NAUSEA: Nausea is not uncommon after surgery. Sometimes the intravenous anesthesia or pain medications are the cause. Nausea can be reduced by preceding each pain pill with a small amount of soft food. Try to keep taking clear liquids and minimize dosing of pain medication, but call us if you do not feel better. Classic Coca Cola/ Soda May help with nausea.

WHAT TO DO AFTER SURGERY: The incision wounds after surgery usually heal quickly and without complications, if simple precautions are taken. Cooperating with your oral surgeon is important. Here are some guidelines and instructions for you to follow to aid in your healing and recovery:

Rest at home, minimize talking, and generally take it easy for 24-48 hours following surgery. It may not be necessary to be in bed rest; but it is important that you rest. Sometimes the after-effects of oral surgery are quite minimal, so not all of these instructions may apply. Common sense will often dictate what you should do. However, when in doubt follow these guidelines or call our office for clarification.

DAY OF SURGERY

FIRST HOUR: Bite down firmly on the gauze packs making sure they remain in place. The packs may be gently removed after you reach home. Look at the gauze before you throw it away; if it is soaked in blood, you do need to replace it with fresh gauze. Prior to replacing the gauze, drink a milkshake, ice cream or yogurt with a spoon (DO NOT USE STRAW FOR AT LEAST SIX DAYS) and then take your pain medication – one prescription strength Motrin and on extra strength Tylenol. Now take two pieces of gauze form the goody bag, roll it like a cigar and fold it and place it snugly in the area of the implant and bite down for 20 minutes (MOISTURIZE THE GAUZE WITH LITTLE BIT OF WATER BEFORE PUTTING IT IN). Redness in the center of the gauze is normal; the gauze needs to be replaced only if it soaked in blood. Intermittent bleeding or oozing overnight is normal.

FIRST 24 HOURS: Do not disturb the surgical area. Do not spit, rinse, brush your teeth at night, consume hot food or use a straw on the day of the surgery. PLEASE DO NOT SMOKE since this is very detrimental to healing.

SWELLING: The surgical area will swell and may become quite large. After the procedure apply an ice pack to the side of the face, 20 minutes on and 5 minutes off until bedtime. Moist heat, like a warm, wet washcloth, will aid in reducing swelling after the first 24 hours. Swelling usually reaches its maximum within the first 40 hours post surgery and then slowly decreases.

PERSISTENT BLEEDING: Bleeding should never be severe. If it is, it usually means that the packs are being clenched between the teeth only and are not exerting pressure on the surgical areas. Try repositioning the packs. If bleeding persists or becomes heavy you may substitute a tea bag (soaked in very hot water, squeezed damp-dry and wrapped in moist gauze) for 30 minutes. If bleeding remains uncontrolled, please call our office to reach the doctor on call. Do not physically exert yourself for 5 days following surgery, as this will cause unexpected bleeding.

PAIN: Unfortunately, most oral surgery is accompanied by some degree of discomfort. You will usually have a prescription for pain medication. If you take the pills before the anesthetic has worn off, you should be able to manage any discomfort better. Repeat the pain medication (Motrin + Tylenol) every four hours on the first two days of surgery while awake. If you feel that the pain is not adequately controlled with the mild pain medication combination, please take the prescribed strong pain medication. We encourage our patients to be couch potatoes on the day of surgery, as activities will increase ooziness and nausea. The effects of pain medication vary widely among individuals. If you find you are taking large amounts of pain medicine at frequent intervals, please call our office.

DIET: Eat any nourishing food that can be taken with comfort. Avoid hot foods on day of surgery. Do not use a straw for the first day after surgery. It is advisable to confine the first day’s intake to liquids or pureed goods (soups (room temperature), puddings, yogurt, milk shakes, etc.). It is best to avoid foods like nuts, sunflower seeds, popcorn etc. for three weeks, as they may get lodged in the socket areas. It is important not to skip meals! If you take nourishment regularly you will feel better, gain strength, have less discomfort and heal faster. If you are diabetic, maintain your normal eating habits or follow instructions given by your doctor. Since you will be taking medication, it is very important that you eat before each medication course to prevent nausea.

FIRST 24 HOURS: Cold, liquid diet only.

SECOND DAY AFTER SURGERY: May start warm, soft food and continue it for 3 weeks.

Here are some foods we recommend:

  • Milk
  • Yogurt
  • Oatmeal or cream of wheat
  • Ice cream
  • Soft boiled or scrambled eggs
  • Milkshakes
  • Soups
  • Applesauce
  • Boiled fish
  • Pudding
  • Potatoes- baked or mashed
  • Jell-O

IF YOU HAVE A TEMPORARY TOOTH PLACED OVER YOUR IMPLANT, PLEASE CONTINUE YOUR SOFT FOOD DIET FOR FOUR MONTHS.

BRUSHING: Begin your normal oral hygiene routine 24 hours after surgery. Soreness and swelling may not permit vigorous brushing, but please make every effort to clean your teeth within the bounds of comfort.

MOUTH RINSES: Keeping your mouth clean after surgery is essential. Rinse only after the first 24 hours. Use ¼ teaspoon of salt dissolved in an 8 ounce glass of warm water and gently rinse with portions of solution, taking five minutes to use the entire glassful. Repeat as often as you like, but certainly after every meal. If you have been prescribed a special mouthwash, please start three days after surgery (NOT BEFORE).

HEALING: Normal healing after placement of an implant should be as follows: The first two days after surgery are generally the most uncomfortable, and there is usually some swelling. On the third day you should be more comfortable and, although still swollen, can usually begin a more substantial diet. The remainder of the post-operative course should be gradual, steady improvement.

BRUISING: Bruising sometimes occurs after implant surgery. It is a natural result of the drilling involved in placing the implant – you should not be alarmed if it occurs. The bruising is often visible a few days’ post-surgery and may be located either above or below the area that the implants were placed.

NAUSEA: Nausea is not uncommon after surgery. Sometimes the intravenous anesthesia or pain medications are the cause. Nausea can be reduced by preceding each pain pill with a small amount of soft food. Try to keep taking clear liquids and minimize dosing of pain medication, but call us if you do not feel better. Classic Coca Cola/ soda may help with nausea.

DENTURES: If you currently wear a full or partial denture or a single-tooth prosthesis (called a “Flipper”), you may wear your appliance immediately after the implant surgery, unless your oral surgeon instructs you otherwise. Your appliance should be left in for the first 24 hours to help contour the gum underneath and minimize swelling. On the day following surgery, your appliance should be removed for cleaning purposes (rinsing and brushing); but it should not be left out for long periods of time until 72 hours’ post-surgery. If your gums hurt due to excessive soreness or unusual pressure from your appliance, you should not wear it until you have seen your dentist or surgeon and have had it modified or re-lined.

Following these instructions will assist you, but if you have questions about your progress, please call our office. You can contact the doctor on call after hours. Calling during office hours will afford a faster response to your questions or concerns.

WHAT TO DO AFTER SURGERY: The incision wounds after surgery usually heal quickly and without complications, if simple precautions are taken. Cooperating with your oral surgeon is important. Here are some guidelines and instruction for you to follow to aid in your healing and recovery:

Rest at home, minimize talking, and generally take it easy for 24-48 hours following surgery. It may not be necessary to be in bed rest; but it is important that you rest. Sometimes the after-effects of oral surgery are quite minimal, so not all of these instructions may apply. Common sense will often dictate what you should do. However, when in doubt follow these guidelines or call our office for clarification.

DAY OF SURGERY

FIRST HOUR: Bite down firmly on the gauze packs making sure they remain in place. The packs may be gently removed after you reach home. Look at the gauze before you throw it away. If it is soaked in blood, you do need to replace it with fresh gauze. Prior to replacing the gauze, drink a milkshake, ice cream or yogurt with a spoon (DO NOT USE STRAW FOR AT LEAST SIX DAYS) and then take your pain medication – one prescription strength Motrin and on extra strength Tylenol. Now take two pieces of gauze form the goody bag, roll it like a cigar and fold it and place it snugly in the area of the implant and bite dawn for 20 minutes (MOISTURIZE THE GAUZE WITH LITLLE BITE OF WATER BEFORE PUTTING IT IN). Redness in the center of the gauze is normal; the gauze needs to be replaced only if it soaked in blood. Intermittent bleeding or oozing overnight is normal.

FIRST 24 HOURS: Do not disturb the surgical area. Do not spit, rinse, brush your teeth at night, consume hot food or use a straw on the day of the surgery. PLEASE DO NOT SMOKE since this is very detrimental to healing.

SWELLING: The surgical area will swell and may become quite large. After the procedure apply an ice pack to the side of the face, 20 minutes on and 5 minutes off until bedtime. Moist heat, like a warm, wet washcloth, will aid in reducing swelling after the first 24 hours. Swelling usually reaches its maximum with in the first 40 hours post surgery and then slowly decreases.

PERSISTENT BLEEDING: Bleeding should never be severe. If it is, it usually means that the packs are being clenched between the teeth only and are not exerting pressure on the surgical areas. Try repositioning the packs. If bleeding persists or becomes heavy you may substitute a tea bag (soaked in very hot water, squeezed damp-dry and wrapped in moist gauze) for a 30 minutes. If bleeding remains uncontrolled, please call our office to reach the doctor on call. Do no physically exert yourself for the 5 days following surgery, as this will cause unexpected bleeding.

PAIN: Unfortunately, most oral surgery is accompanied by some degree of discomfort. You will usually have a prescription for pain medication. If you take the pills before the anesthetic has worn off, you should be able to manage any discomfort better. Do repeat the pain medication (Motrin + Tylenol) every four hours on the first two days of surgery while awake. If you feel that the pain is not adequately controlled with the mild pain medication combination, please take the prescribed strong pain medication. We encourage out patients to be couch potatoes on the day of surgery, as activities will increase ooziness and nausea. The effects of pain medication vary widely among individuals. If you find you are taking large amounts of pain medicine at frequent intervals, please call out office.

DIET: Eat any nourishing food that can be taken with comfort. Avoid hot foods on day of surgery. Do not use a straw for the first day after surgery. It is advisable to confine the first day’s intake to liquids or pureed goods (soups (room temperature), puddings, yogurt, milk shakes, etc.). It is best to avoid foods like nuts, sunflower seeds, popcorn etc. for three weeks, as they may get lodged in the socket areas. It is important not to skip meals! If you take nourishment regularly you will feel better, again strength, have less discomfort and heal faster. If you are diabetic, maintain your normal eating habits or follow instruction given by your doctor. Since you will be taking medication, it is very important that you eat before each medication course to prevent nausea.

FIRST 24 HOURS: Cold, liquid diet only.

SECOND DAY AFTER SURGERY: May start warm, soft food and continue it for 3 weeks.

Here are some foods we recommend:

  • Milk
  • Yogurt
  • Oatmeal or cream of wheat
  • Ice cream
  • Soft boiled or scrambled eggs
  • Milkshakes
  • Soups
  • Applesauce
  • Boiled fish
  • Pudding
  • Potatoes- baked or mashed
  • Jell-O

BRUSHING: Begin your normal oral hygiene routine 24 hours after surgery. Soreness and swelling may not permit vigorous brushing, but please make every effort to clean your teeth within the bounds of comfort.

MOUTH RINSES: Keeping your mouth clean after surgery is essential. Rinse only after the first 24 hours. Use ¼ teaspoon of salt dissolved in an 8 ounce glass of warm water and gently rinse with portions of solution, taking five minutes to use the entire glassful. Repeat as often as you like, but certainly after every meal.

HEALING: Normal healing after sinus lift should be as follows: the first two days after surgery are generally the most uncomfortable, and there is usually some swelling. On the third day you should be more comfortable and, although still swollen, can usually begin a more substantial diet. The remainder of the post-operative course should be gradual, steady improvement.

BRUISING: Bruising sometimes occurs after sinus lift surgery. It is a natural result of the drilling involved in placing the implant- you should not be alarmed if it occurs. The bruising is often visible a few days post-surgery and may be located either above or below the area that the implants were placed.

NAUSEA: Nausea is not uncommon after surgery. Sometimes the intravenous anesthesia or pain medications are the cause. Nausea can be reduced by preceding each pain pill with a small amount of soft food. Try to keep taking clear liquids and minimize dosing of pain medication, but call us if you do not feel better. Classic Coca Cola/ Soda May help with nausea.

CERTAIN PRECAUTIONS WILL ASSIST HEALING AND WE ASK THAT YOU FAITHFULLY FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS:

TAKE PRESCRIPTIONS AS DIRECTED

  • Purchase AFRIN Nasal Spray (Available over the counter). Spray 2 puffs each nostril AM and PM for 3 days.
  • Do not forcefully spit for 1 week
  • Do not smoke for 10 days.
  • Do not use a straw for 1 week.
  • Do not forcefully blow your nose for at least two weeks, even though your sinus may fell “stuffy” or there may be some nasal drainage.
  • Use Q-tips to clean nose.
  • Purchase OCEAN Nasal Spray (Available over the counter). Use several times a day to keep nose moist.
  • Try not to squeeze; it will cause undesired sinus pressure. If you must sneeze, keep your mouth open.
  • Eat only soft foods for several days, always trying to chew on the opposite side of your mouth.
  • Do not rinse vigorously for several days. Gentle salt water swishes may be used.

Keep our office advised of any changes in your condition, especially if drainage or pain increases. It is important that you keep all future appointments until this is healed.

Thank you for choosing us for your root canal therapy. Please follow the guidelines below and contact us with any questions.

  1. For the next 30 minutes, do not eat or drink anything. You have a temporary filling that takes about 1/2 hour to harden. Please do not feel around your tooth with your tongue.
  2. If any prescriptions were given, please have them filled promptly. If no prescriptions were given and you are not allergic, you may use any ibuprofen type of medication such as Motrin or Advil, 3 tablets (600mg) every 6-8 hours as needed for discomfort and alleviation of swelling. Alternatively, you may use Tylenol, 1000mg every 6-8 hours as needed. Do not exceed the guidelines printed on the label for any medication. If you are unable to achieve adequate pain control, please call our office.
  3. You may find using an ice pack on the affected area helpful. Please do not apply ice directly to the skin, have a cloth between the ice and skin at all times. You may apply the ice for up to 20 minutes on and 20 minutes off for the next 6-8 hours as needed.
  4. Once you begin to eat and drink, avoid chewing or biting on the area worked on until your permanent restoration is in place. The area may be more sensitive due to swelling. The temporary in place is a soft composite that is vulnerable to fracturing (cracking) with hard substances such as peanuts, pretzels, hard candy, ice cubes, etc. You will need to see a restorative dentist within a month to have a permanent crown placed. Please contact your restorative dentist to make an appointment at your earliest convenience. Waiting longer than a month increases the chances that the temporary will fracture and/or decay will develop, in which case, you are at fault and will be responsible for all costs to have it redone.
  5. Please keep the area worked on clean by gently brushing the area and flossing regularly.
  6. It is rare for a temporary filling to fall out although it may divot while in use. If the temporary falls out please contact your general dentist as soon as possible. If your temporary falls out after office hours you may purchase some temporary filling material from a pharmacy and follow the included instructions.
  7. Some discomfort is normal for 2 to 4 days following the treatment. In some cases the tooth and surrounding tissue may be sore for a few weeks following the treatment.
  8. Normal brushing and flossing are okay, unless otherwise specified by your doctor. Follow any other instructions provided by the office on your visit. Please take all medications as prescribed.

While flare-ups are rare, they occur in about 5% of cases and cause significant pain. They occur with teeth that are extremely irritated and/or infected or with teeth that have a history of prior treatment. These sometimes occur randomly, even on patients that have had root canals done in the past without problems. If you have a flare-up you may experience moderate to severe pain, swelling, throbbing or general discomfort; please contact our office. You may be prescribed additional medication such as antibiotics and/or you may be asked to come to the office for further treatment. Should you experience any of these symptoms, please contact the office, even after hours.

Scaling and root planing therapy includes removing tartar and bacterial plaque from the root surface below the gum line. This helps reduce inflammation and infection and improves the depth of periodontal pockets, therefore allowing more efficient flossing and brushing.

For the first 24 hours you may experience some cold and heat sensitivity. Do not eat, drink, chew or consume hot foods or beverages until the numbness has worn off following anesthetic. Avoid vigorous physical exercise as well as foods and are extremely hot or spicy for the first 24 hours. Do not consume alcoholic beverages or smoke for at least 48 hours. Some bleeding following a deep cleaning is normal, but if you experience excessive bleeding please call our office.

You can take ibuprofen or acetaminophen according to the instructions on the label or those provided by your doctor as needed. A warm salt water rinse, approximately one teaspoon in an eight ounce glass of water, three times a day can be helpful. Brush and floss gently following a deep cleaning, resuming normal brushing and flossing when the soreness is gone.

Follow any other instructions provided by our office on your visit. Please take all medications as prescribed.

After your procedure please do not disturb the area. Avoid forcefully rinsing or spitting. Do not drink through a straw. Some bleeding is normal for the first 24 hours. Biting on a gauze pad placed directly on the wound for 30 minutes will help reduce bleeding. If bleeding continues please call our office. Please take all medications, including mouth rinses, as prescribed.

After 24 hours, warm salt water rinses (½ teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water) can be used 4-5 times a day after meals. After 24 hours, brush your teeth with a soft manual toothbrush. Be gentle with brushing the surgical areas.

Sutures may be placed after the surgery and most sutures dissolve on their own.

Swelling and bruising may occur. The use of ice packs following your surgery will help diminish the swelling you may experience in the first 48-72 hours following surgery. Applying ice for 15-20 minutes followed by resting the same amount of time works very well. After 24 hours if swelling is till present, a warm pack can be applied to aid in comfort and reduce swelling and bruising. Alternate the warm pack on and off in 15 minute intervals, as needed.

Drink plenty of fluids. Stay away from spicy foods. Also avoid sharp and crunchy foods like tacos, chips and nuts. Tobacco and alcohol should not be used for 24 hours following surgery. Alcohol should not be used in combination with pain medications or antibiotics.

Keep physical activities to a minimum immediately following surgery.

During office hours, immediate attention will be given to your situation, and you will be seen as soon as possible. After office hours, please give the office call and follow the instructions provided. Your call will be returned as soon as possible. If you are experiencing a serious or life threatening emergency, please call 911 or visit the nearest emergency room.

After your procedure please do not disturb the area. Avoid forcefully rinsing or spitting. Some bleeding is normal for the first 24 hours. Biting on a gauze pad placed directly on the wound for 30 minutes will help reduce bleeding. If bleeding continues please call our office.

 

Please take all medications, including mouth rinses, as prescribed.

Warm salt water rinses (½ teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water) can be used 4-5 times a day after meals. Brush your teeth with a soft manual toothbrush. Be gentle with brushing the surgical areas. Sutures may be placed after the surgery and most sutures dissolve on their own.

Swelling and bruising may occur. The use of ice packs following your surgery will help diminish the swelling you may experience in the next 48-72 hours. Applying ice for 15-20 minutes followed by resting the same amount of time works very well.

Drink plenty of fluids. Stay away from spicy foods. Also avoid sharp and crunchy foods like tacos, chips and nuts. Tobacco and alcohol should not be used. Alcohol should not be used in combination with pain medications or antibiotics.

Keep physical activities to a minimum immediately following surgery.

If a surgical bandage was used, it is desirable for it to remain in place for 24 hours. Do not remove it; it will come off when ready. Once removed, you can begin cleaning the wound gently with a cotton swab dipped in a mouth rinse.

During office hours, immediate attention will be given to your situation, and you will be seen as soon as possible. After office hours, please give the office a call and follow the instructions provided. Your call will be returned as soon as possible. In the event of an emergency, please call our office. If you are experiencing a serious or life threatening emergency, please call 911 or visit the nearest emergency room.

Follow any other instructions provided by the office on your visit. Please take all medications as prescribed including your prescribed antibiotics to help prevent infection.

After your procedure please do not disturb the area. Avoid forcefully rinsing or spitting. Some bleeding is normal for the first 24 hours. Biting on a gauze pad placed directly on the wound for 30 minutes will help reduce bleeding. If bleeding continues please call our office.

Please take all medications, including mouth rinses, as prescribed.

Swelling and bruising may occur. The use of ice packs following your surgery will help diminish the swelling you may experience in the next 48-72 hours. Applying ice for 15-20 minutes followed by resting the same amount of time works very well.

After 24 hours, brushing and oral hygiene procedures should be done as usual in all untreated areas. In the treated areas, please limit your oral hygiene to brushing using a soft manual toothbrush. Avoid dental flossing in treated areas during the first week following surgery. No undiluted mouthwash, salt water or peroxide rinses should be used during the first week following surgery.

Drink plenty of fluids. Stay away from spicy or acidic foods. Also avoid sharp and crunchy foods like tacos, chips and nuts. Tobacco and alcohol should not be used. Alcohol should not be used in combination with pain medications or antibiotics.

Keep physical activities to a minimum immediately following surgery. Avoid strenuous activity for 2-3 days.

During office hours, immediate attention will be given to your situation, and you will be seen as soon as possible. After office hours, please give the office a call and follow the instructions provided. Your call will be returned as soon as possible. In the event of an emergency, please call our office. If you are experiencing a serious or life threatening emergency, please call 911 or visit the nearest emergency room.

Crowns and Bridges may take one to three visits to complete. We will inform you of your treatment options and the time needed to complete the procedure. You may have some sensitivity following treatment with tenderness around the gum and tooth for a day or two. If the tenderness or sensitivity lasts longer than this please contact our office. If anesthesia is used, avoid chewing, biting, and eating until the numbness has worn off. If you have a temporary placed, eat softer foods and avoid foods that are particularly crunchy, chewy or hard. If the temporary restorations become loose or break, please call us immediately.

Carefully clean around the restoration, brushing and flossing daily. When flossing, take extra care not to loosen the temporary restoration by removing the floss too roughly. You can slowly thread the floss out by one end if necessary to avoid too much pressure on the temporary.

Once your final restoration has been placed avoid chewing on hard, crunchy or sticky foods for 24 hours in order to give time for the cement to fully bond. Mild sensitivity to hot or cold foods is not unusual and should dissipate after a few weeks. If sensitivity lasts more than six weeks please let the office know, although this happens infrequently.

Ongoing care for your restoration includes brushing your teeth after every meal and snack and flossing at least once a day before bedtime. Rinsing your mouth with water or mouthwash with also help to remove any additional particles that may have been missed during brushing and flossing.

Please call our office if you are in pain or have any questions regarding your treatment.

Do not eat or chew until any numbness from anesthesia has worn off. If you are supervising a child who had treatment, make certain that they are not eating or chewing while numb. Please make sure they do not bite their lips or tongue as it can cause serious injury to their soft tissue. Avoid sticky, crunchy or hard foods for 24 hours.

Sensitivity to cold and heat, as well as any soreness, shouldn’t last more than a few days. Please call our office if you experience pain or discomfort for more than a few days.

You may have discomfort for a few days after receiving your final dentures or partials. Dentures and partials will often need several adjustments in order to fit comfortably. To help adjust to your dentures you can practice reading aloud for a little while each day. At night you should remove your dentures and clean them. They should be stored in a clean container filled with denture cleaning solution. Dentures should be removed for at least 6 hours a day to give your mouth and gums time to rest. Food particles can become trapped under dentures causing inflammation or sore spots. Brush the roof of your mouth, your tongue and lightly brush your gums after removing your dentures.

Ongoing care for your restoration includes brushing your teeth and surrounding tissues after every meal and snack, and flossing at least once a day before bedtime unless you have full dentures, in which case brushing them is very important. Rinsing your mouth with water or mouthwash will also help to remove any additional particles that may have been missed during brushing and flossing.

You should visit our office at least once a year to have your dentures or partial adjusted and checked by the doctor. Wearing ill-fitting dentures or partials without proper care and adjustment can cause severe bone loss and very serious oral disease. Please call our office at the first signs of any symptoms or if you are experiencing ongoing pain or discomfort.

Do

  • First place the aligners over your front teeth, and then use your fingers to push the aligner down gently over your molars. When aligners are correctly inserted, they will fit all the way down on the teeth, with no space between the top of the aligners and the top of the teeth. Aligners will fit tightly at first but should fit well at the end of the two-week period.
  • Keep aligners in except when flossing, brushing, and eating. It’s also best to remove the aligners when drinking warm beverages such as coffee or tea.
  • Remove the aligner by pulling it off both sides of your back teeth simultaneously then lifting it off of your front teeth.
  • Place your aligners in the case we provided any time they are not being worn.
  • Clean aligners with a toothbrush and toothpaste.
  • Wear each set of aligners for two weeks unless our office directs you to vary from this schedule.
  • Wear aligners in the correct numerical order. (Each aligner is labeled by number and with a U or an L to designate upper or lower.)
  • Keep all of your old aligners and bring them to your orthodontic appointments.

Don’t

  • Don’t place your aligners in or on a napkin or tissue. Many aligners have accidentally been thrown out this way!
  • Don’t use your teeth to “bite” your aligners into place.
  • If you have pets, don’t place your aligners anywhere that your pets can reach them. Pets are attracted to saliva and would enjoy chewing on your Invisalign trays!
  • Do not use Denture cleaner, alcohol, or bleach to clean your aligners.
  • Do not use boiling water or warm water on your aligners.
  • Don’t chew gum with your aligners in.
  • It would be best not to smoke while wearing aligners. The smoke can stain the aligners as well as your teeth.

Just in Case

If you lose the tab attached to your tooth that helps the aligner snap on, please call our office right away so that we can determine if you need to come in before your next scheduled appointment.

If you lose one of your aligner trays, please wear the next tray if you have it. If you do not have the next tray, please wear the previous tray. It is extremely important to use a tray to keep teeth from shifting. Call our office to let us know which tray was lost so that we can determine if a replacement tray is needed. There will be a fee if replacement trays are required.

For the First 48 Hours Following Bleaching:

Teeth are more susceptible to staining for 48 hours after bleaching treatments. For the 48 hours after whitening, it is best to avoid dark-colored food or beverages that can stain your teeth. Any item that can stain your clothes can also stain your teeth.

Avoid berries, cola or other dark sodas, red wine, coffee and tea, tobacco and ketchup, soy or other dark sauces.

Using Your Custom Trays:

Follow the instructions given by our office, placing the bleaching gel in the center of each tooth position on the tray so that the gel will rest against the anterior surface of the teeth once it is placed in your mouth. Wear trays for the recommended time. Rinse the mouth and gently remove any gel remaining on your teeth with a soft bristle toothbrush. Clean the trays.

Pedodontic After Care


Little Girl Holding Toothbrush and Giant Teddy Bear in Dental Chair
A thorough cleaning may produce some bleeding and tenderness or discomfort around the gums. If this persists 2-3 days after the cleaning, you may help the child rinse with warm salt water 2-3 times per day. For discomfort you may also give your child Children’s Tylenol, Advil or Motrin as directed for the age and weight of your child.
After most fluoride treatments, patients should not eat or drink for at least 30 minutes to increase the fluoride’s direct contact with the teeth.
After a sealant is placed, your child may feel the coating on their teeth. The feeling subsides within 24 hours. After the sealant appointment your child should refrain from eating sticky or chewy foods for 24 hours.
Following Anesthesia: Monitor your child closely for approximately two hours following the appointment. It is often wise to keep your child on a liquid or soft diet until the anesthetic has worn off. Remind your child to refrain from biting, picking, scratching, sucking, or playing with the numb areas.

Operative Care/Fillings: Some tooth and gum tissue manipulation was necessary to perform the procedure and may result in sensitivity or discomfort. Should this occur, you may give your child Children’s Tylenol, Advil or Motrin as directed for the age and weight of your child. If sensitivity or discomfort continues for more than 24 hours, please contact our office.

Pulp treatment (aka Pulpotomy/Pulpectomy/Baby Root Canals): If your child is experiencing sensitivity after this treatment, you may give your child Children’s Tylenol, Advil or Motrin as directed for the age and weight of your child. If sensitivity or discomfort continues for more than 24 hours, please contact our office.

Extractions: Please instruct you child not to rinse, spit, or drink through a straw. Have them keep fingers and tongue away from the area. If unusual or sustained bleeding occurs, place cotton gauze firmly over the extraction area and bite down or hold in place for thirty minutes. Repeat every thirty minutes until the area is no longer bleeding. Maintain a soft diet for a day or two, or until the child feels comfortable eating normally again. Avoid strenuous exercise and physical activity for the rest of the day after the extraction. For discomfort use Children’s Tylenol, Advil, or Motrin as directed for the age and weight of your child. If sensitivity or discomfort continues for more than 24 hours, please contact our office.

Orthodontic Braces Care


Class Full of Kids Smiling

Having braces should not cause any major changes in your day-to-day activities. You can still dine out, sing, play a musical instrument, or have pictures taken. With proper care and maintenance, you can promote your oral health while on your way to a more beautiful smile.


Having braces should not cause any major changes in your day-to-day activities. You can still dine out, sing, play a musical instrument, or have pictures taken. With proper care and maintenance, you can promote your oral health while on your way to a more beautiful smile.

If you play a wind instrument, several companies make mouth guards and lip protectors, although you may not need them.

For certain sports it is a good idea to wear a mouth guard. Ask us about recommendations based on your specific needs when you come in for your next appointment.

When making your dining choice, choose softer foods and avoid foods that are particularly hard, chewy, crunchy or sticky. Cut or tear pizza and sandwiches before eating them rather than trying to bite through them. Chopping up items like apples or carrots before eating them is a good idea. When your braces are adjusted, your teeth may be a little more sensitive, so choosing softer food like pasta, soups or a healthy smoothie can be a good choice. Please avoid chewing gum and chewing on ice.

Carefully follow all instructions you are given regarding your dental care. Specific steps may vary depending on the type of braces you have. Be sure to brush thoroughly after any meal or snack. It is important to keep your teeth and braces as clean as possible to avoid potential problems. Also, rinse with water or mouthwash after brushing. It’s a good idea to carry a travel toothbrush when you will be away from home. Before going to bed at night be sure to brush thoroughly and floss carefully. It may take a little extra time but this is an important step in maintaining your oral hygiene on your way to a better smile and healthier teeth.

Use a soft rounded-bristle toothbrush that is in good condition. Toothbrushes will wear out faster and need to be replaced more often when wearing braces, so be sure to keep some spare toothbrushes on hand. When brushing you should also brush your tongue and rinse thoroughly when done.

Flossing is an important part of good oral hygiene.  With braces it may take a little more time and practice, and a floss threader may be necessary to get the floss under the archwire.  Make sure you clean along and under the gum lines with floss each night before going to bed.  After you have properly brushed and flossed, your braces should look clean and shiny, making it easy to see the edges of the braces.
If you have a removable orthodontic appliance, it is important to clean it each night and morning to remove dental plaque.  Remove the appliance and clean it with a toothbrush and toothpaste.
Do

  • Use your fingers to put your aligners place. First place the aligners over your front teeth, and then use your fingers to push the aligner down gently over your molars. Aligners will fit tightly at first but should fit well at the end of the two-week period.
  • Keep aligners in except when flossing, brushing, and eating. It’s also best to remove the aligners when drinking warm beverages such as coffee or tea.
  • Remove the aligner by pulling it off both sides of your back teeth simultaneously then lifting it off of your front teeth.
  • Place your aligners in the case we provided any time they are not being worn.
  • Clean aligners with a toothbrush and toothpaste.
  • Wear each set of aligners for two weeks unless our office directs you to vary from this schedule.
  • Wear aligners in the correct numerical order. (Each aligner is labeled by number and with a U or an L to designate upper or lower.)
  • Keep all of your old aligners and bring them to your orthodontic appointments.

Don’t

  • Don’t place your aligners in or on a napkin or tissue. Many aligners have accidentally been thrown out this way!
  • Don’t use your teeth to “bite” your aligners into place.
  • If you have pets, don’t place your aligners anywhere that your pets can reach them. Pets are attracted to saliva and would enjoy chewing on your Invisalign trays!
  • Do not use Denture cleaner, alcohol, or bleach to clean your aligners.
  • Do not use boiling water or warm water on your aligners.
  • Don’t chew gum with your aligners in.
  • It would be best not to smoke while wearing aligners. The smoke can stain the aligners as well as your teeth.

Just in Case

If you lose the tab attached to your tooth that helps the aligner snap on, please call our office right away so that we can determine if you need to come in before your next scheduled appointment.

If you lose one of your aligner trays, please wear the next tray if you have it. If you do not have the next tray, please wear the previous tray. It is extremely important to use a tray to keep teeth from shifting. Call our office to let us know which tray was lost so that we can determine if a replacement tray is needed. There will be a fee if replacement trays are required.

Dental wax can be very helpful with any areas that are irritating your mouth or gums.  This can be especially helpful at night when sleeping when your mouth may get drier than during the daytime when you can regularly hydrate.
Wear a mouth guard when playing sports to protect the mouth from injury.
Keep these materials on hand to help with the most common orthodontic maintenance and minor emergencies:

Interdental or Proxabrushes fit between teeth and help patients to clean around wires without damaging them.

Non-medicated orthodontic relief wax can be placed over brackets or wires that may be irritating gum tissues.

Antibacterial Mouthwash can be used to reduce inflammation and prevent infection. For minor sores in the mouth, Peroxyl, an antiseptic rinse containing hydrogen peroxide may be used up to 4 times per day after brushing. Refer to the product label for specific instructions.

Dental floss, an interproximal brush or a toothpick can be used for removing food that gets caught between teeth or wires.

Sterile tweezers can be used to replace orthodontic rubber bands that have come off.

A Q-tip or pencil eraser can be used to push a wire up against a tooth if it has come loose and is irritating the cheeks or gums. If it is not possible to reposition the wire so it is more comfortable, place wax over the end of the wire and call our office so that we can set a time to have the wire adjusted and put back into place.

Salt is used for warm salt-water rinses, which help heal sore gums and tissues in the mouth.

Non-prescription pain relievers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, can help with the temporary discomfort that sometimes occurs for the first day or two after an orthodontic adjustment.

Topical Anesthetic Treatments, such as Orabase or Ora-Gel, can be applied with a Q-tip to any abrasions or sores in the mouth should they occur.